IMG_3352.JPG
IMG_3353.JPG
IMG_3354.JPG
IMG_3355.JPG
IMG_3209.JPG
IMG_3386.JPG
Four by Six Audio (2012)
4 by 6 (2012)
_DSC5396.jpg
Hear, This, Now (2013)
Hear, This, Now (2013)
Hear, This, Now (2013)
Four by Six Audio (2012)

When the viewer/listener walks into the installation space of Four by Six, the sound of his or her own footsteps mask the sound produced by the installation. The individual’s auditory reflex forces his or her body to orient toward the source of the footsteps being produced by the installation.

The viewer/listener assigns a human presence to the footsteps giving the sound a physical space to occupy due to the cultural rules that define personal space. This effectively defines an architectural space for the sound to exist within. The rhythm of the steps helps to reinforce the connection between the sound and a psychological response from the viewer/listener. 

When the pace is combined with the localized sound it creates anxiety within the viewer/listener challenging how we relate to the physical presence of sound and its connection to our body.

4 by 6 (2012)

When the viewer/listener walks into the installation space of Four by Six, the sound of his or her own footsteps mask the sound produced by the installation. The individual’s auditory reflex forces his or her body to orient toward the source of the footsteps being produced by the installation.

The viewer/listener assigns a human presence to the footsteps giving the sound a physical space to occupy due to the cultural rules that define personal space. This effectively defines an architectural space for the sound to exist within. The rhythm of the steps helps to reinforce the connection between the sound and a psychological response from the viewer/listener. 

When the pace is combined with the localized sound it creates anxiety within the viewer/listener challenging how we relate to the physical presence of sound and its connection to our body.

Hear, This, Now (2013)

“Dance is a fundamentally ephemeral—ever-shifting, finding life at the perpetual limit of the present moment. Choreography sets movement attempting to prevent time from erasing the dance. Improvising embraces our temporal fate; we create the dance in the liminal space—living at the continuous threshold between where the dance is born, and where it dies.”

“Artistic Direction: David Marchant

Composition Improvised and Performed by the Cast

Lighting Designer: Adam Hogan”

Hear, This, Now (2013)

“Dance is a fundamentally ephemeral—ever-shifting, finding life at the perpetual limit of the present moment. Choreography sets movement attempting to prevent time from erasing the dance. Improvising embraces our temporal fate; we create the dance in the liminal space—living at the continuous threshold between where the dance is born, and where it dies.”

“Artistic Direction: David Marchant

Composition Improvised and Performed by the Cast

Lighting Designer: Adam Hogan”

Hear, This, Now (2013)

“Dance is a fundamentally ephemeral—ever-shifting, finding life at the perpetual limit of the present moment. Choreography sets movement attempting to prevent time from erasing the dance. Improvising embraces our temporal fate; we create the dance in the liminal space—living at the continuous threshold between where the dance is born, and where it dies.”

“Artistic Direction: David Marchant

Composition Improvised and Performed by the Cast

Lighting Designer: Adam Hogan”